Tag: Kimball Art Center

Exhibition Reviews | Visual Arts

At the Kimball, Lee Mingwei Offers Utah Residents the Gift of Connection

With their latest installation, Park City’s Kimball Art Center adds itself to a prestigious international list of exhibition hosts for internationally renowned artist Lee Mingwei. The Taiwanese-American artist’s work focuses on (among other things) intimacy and connection. He explores the ubiquitous nature of these raw human moments and […]

Exhibition Reviews | Visual Arts

David Hartt’s Unexpectedly Familiar and Surprisingly Plangent Views

When I remember my favorite movie scenes, it’s often because of something particularly revealing that an actor does. But in the hands of a really good director, there is always another actor in the scene whose work I may not remember — may not even consciously notice — but whose work precedes those I do notice and may be far more telling. Perhaps the camera holds a shot for a several seconds, until I become aware that through its lens I am fixated, staring at something. Then it wheels about and fixes on something else, and I understand what the character sees and how they are thinking. The camera in those minutes reveals itself as the most important actor.

Exhibition Reviews | Visual Arts

Art That Awakens: Kimball’s Alas Alack is a Visually Stimulating Installation with an Intelligent, Meaningful Message

“Cloven,” by Nicole Pietrantoni, at the Kimball Art Center, photo by Stanna Frampton  “Reader, this is a record of loss and abundance. Let me be clear – what is vulnerable has potential for change. Reader, as this is consequential, so let us be systematic.” So opens an excision […]

Exhibition Reviews | Visual Arts

You Are Here: Svavar Jonatansson and Jared Steffensen’s Takes on Place at the Kimball Art Center

We’ve all been guilty of it — visiting an exotic locale, taking a few shots of its iconic attractions, and feeling like we’ve captured the essence of the place. If we’re alert, we come home and realize that everyone else has a shot of Venice’s gondolas from St. Mark’s Square, or the winding streets of Montmartre (and that all the people in the shots are tourists) and wonder if there wasn’t something more to be discovered. Our backyard is such a locale for millions of tourists from across the country, many of whom visit the national parks as quickly as we might Rialto and St. Mark’s. Those of us who live here, though, know what the place looks like from within — the myriad attractions tucked away into cliffs and canyons far from the motorist’s gaze…