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October 2011
Utah's Art Magazine: Published by Artists of Utah
Page 2    
Installation at the Leonardo in Salt Lake City, photo by Shalee Cooper
Installation at the Leonardo in Salt Lake City, photo by Shalee Cooper
1497 South Main Street, photo by Will Thompson
Installation at the Leonardo in Salt Lake City, photo by Shalee Cooper
Bicycle Wheel – 353 W. 200 S.
Bridgette Meinhold's studio, Summer 2011. Photo by Kelly GreenInstallation at the Leonardo in Salt Lake City, photo by Shalee Cooper
Installation at the Leonardo in Salt Lake City, photo by Shalee Cooper
Installation at the Leonardo in Salt Lake City, photo by Shalee Cooper
Installation at the Leonardo in Salt Lake City, photo by Shalee Cooper
Installation at the Leonardo in Salt Lake City, photo by Shalee Cooper
In Plain Site: Salt Lake City
The Leonardo Is Here


After controversies and long delays The Leonardo will finally open its doors this weekend. Housed in what used to be Salt Lake's main library, the Leonardo is "a contemporary Sci+Tech+Art museum, where today’s big ideas, questions, inventions and discoveries are connected in a whole new way." After the opening date was pushed forward multiple times, a three-month installation schedule was squeezed into three weeks. Working round the clock, the Leonardo install team, led by tech wizard and beard aficionado Ben Weimeyer, has completed scores of art and tech installations on three levels. 15 Bytes was allowed in to get us a sneak peak at what you'll find inside.

Installation at the Leonardo in Salt Lake City, photo by Shalee Cooper
Installation at the Leonardo in Salt Lake City, photo by Shalee Cooper
 
Installation at the Leonardo in Salt Lake City, photo by Shalee Cooper
Photo by Zoe Rodriguez
 
Installation at the Leonardo in Salt Lake City, photo by Shalee Cooper
Installation at the Leonardo in Salt Lake City, photo by Shalee Cooper
 
Installation at the Leonardo in Salt Lake City, photo by Shalee Cooper
Installation at the Leonardo in Salt Lake City, photo by Shalee Cooper
Installation at the Leonardo in Salt Lake City, photo by Shalee Cooper
1497 South Main Street , photo by Will Thompson


The Leonardo
The Leonardo, continued


A lot of people will just be curious to get inside what was for many years Salt Lake's main library. There are virtually no books left, but the two-story Doug Snow painting commissioned when the library was first built, a vertical abstraction culminating in a white, bird-like form, is still there. Viewing it, as one used to, from the center escalators is made difficult by Hylozoic Veil, the installation by internationally renowned artist and architect, Phillip Beesley that creates an environment to explore the topic of “responsive architecture,”: an artificial forest of mechanical fronds surround you and respond to your presence, "almost like a giant lung breathing in and out around visitors."

Originally slated as a science museum (many people have had San Francisco's Exploratorium in mind), the Leonardo has turned out to be as much about technology as about science. Visitors will be able to learn about -- and more importantly create -- animations and films, using the Leonardo's green screen and digital capture studio in the Digital Commons. You'll be able to try on prosthetic feet and see what it is like to walk as an amputee.

The Leonardo is also much about contemporary art, especially where it intersects with science and technology disciplines. Separating the free lobby area from the first floor exhibition space, Brian Brush and Yong Ju Lee's The Dynamic Performance of Nature is a wave-shaped wall that spans the width of the building. Built of recycled plastic fins, the solar powered work contains a series of LED lights that creates patterns based on data generated by a network of crowd-sourced sensors.

The main floor contains a Video Gallery, which features short films like Al Haworth's Smog Lake City (see our article), and a Projects Gallery that features four art-science projects: Area Nano, Kate Nichols' delicate paintings using nano-particle paint; Suzanne Kanatsiz and Mick Allen's Sound Rings, an exploration of interactivity, sound and structure; TERRA . AUCTUS . I , which shows the rise and fall of wheatgrass and the beauty of layered life and death; and Holotype Location, Amy Caron's installation which begins this month as a skeletal rebar structure but which will be added on to over the next four months (we'll be looking at all four in more detail in blog posts this month).

The Leonardo also has a residency space where artists, designers and other creative professionals will set up their studio for a week or two at a time, allowing the public to watch them work and discuss their process.

And, finally, don't miss the Red Call Box, which is in the front lobby before you enter the main space. A project we first reported on in September of 2009, the Red Call Box is a British telephone booth transformed by a group of local artists into an exhibition space. The group includes painters, filmmakers, writers, actors and sculptors, and envisions using it as what Jann Haworth described as the "the world's smallest Mini-Multiplex: theatre /Cinema/Gallery and Museum."

 
15 Bytes: About Us
Our editorial contributors this edition

Simon BlundellSimon Blundell is a Salt Lake native and has studied art, communication, journalism, design, and advertising. He has a Master of Fine Arts (MFA) and continues to explore photography and art in all its aspects. He loves music, literature, film, good food, travel, and motorcycles.

Jared ChristensenJared Christensen grew up in North Ogden, Utah and finally moved to Salt Lake at the age of 18 to go to school. He is currently at Westminster College pursuing a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in photography.

John HughesEhren Clark studied art history at both the University of Utah and the University of Reading in the UK. He is now a professional writer.


John HughesShalee Cooper is a freelance photographer and Curator. She is the Image Editor of 15 Bytes Magazine and an Associate Instructor at the University of Utah. She is currently working on The Heel Toe Project.


Sarah JensenSarah Barth-Jensen, the mother of five, taught Elementary School for a number of years and has exposed scores of children to the alphabet. She enjoys making natural stone jewelry.


Jared ChristensenGerry Johnson was an engineer in a past life. A former film, now digital photographer, his work over the last 3 years has been "to capture the 'moments of beauty' that surround each of us in our daily lives, and present them to the viewer in a way that they can also experience the spirit of beauty."

Sue MartinSue Martin holds an M.A. in Theatre and has worked in public relations. As an artist, she works in watercolor, oil, and acrylic to capture Utah landscapes or the beauty of everyday objects in still life.


Shawn RossiterShawn Rossiter, a native of Boston, grew up on the East Coast. He has degrees in English, French and Italian Literature. He dropped out of a Masters program in Contemporary Literature to pursue a career as an artist. He founded Artists of Utah in 2001 and is editor of its magazine, 15 Bytes.


Jared ChristensenWill Thompson is a local photographer who specializes in work that is textural, intimate, and speaks to the space in our subconscious that seeks peace and tranquility. His work ranges from portraiture to abstract fine art.

Tony WatsonTony Watson is originally from Washington State but has lived most of his adult life in Utah. No one occupation has occupied his working hours but his leisure hours are spent either climbing southern Utah's redrock country or engaging his mind with aesthetic issues.


15 Bytes
is published monthly by Artists of Utah, a 501 (c) 3 non-profit organization located in Salt Lake City Utah. The opinions expressed in these articles are those of the contributors and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of 15 Bytes or Artists of Utah. Our editions are published monthly on the first Wednesday of the month. Our deadline for submissions is the last Wednesday of the preceding month.

Writers and photographers who contribute material to 15 Bytes are members of the visual arts community who volunteer their time. Please contact the editor if you have an idea for an article or feature, or if you would like to volunteer your time to the organization.

Materials may be mailed to:
Artists of Utah
P.O. Box 526292
SLC, UT 84152

Editor: Shawn Rossiter
Assistant Editor: Laura Durham
Image Editor: Shalee Cooper
Mixed Media: Terrece Beesley
You can contact 15 Bytes at editor@artistsofutah.org

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