Tag: UMOCA

Still from Chase Westfall's video Control, showing drummer Julian Dorio.
Current Edition | Exhibition Reviews | Visual Arts

Playing After Paris: Violence, Resilience, and Reconciliation in the Work of Chase Westfall

Secluded in a small, pitch-black viewing room in the Utah Museum of Contemporary Art, a troubled musician suddenly breaks into a virtuosic drum solo. Both terrifying and impressive, the performance unleashes a combination of sounds that is just shy of chaos. After a few minutes of what seems […]

Exhibition Reviews | Visual Arts

How far into the tunnel are you willing to shine your flashlight? Earl Gravy and Homebodies, Away Teams at UMOCA

As someone who studies and writes about Contemporary art, I have often pointed out its tendency to be overly specific. There’s a real difference between Theodore Gericault’s “Raft of the Medusa” (1819), protesting a single event that scandalized Europe, and a porcelain figure of Michael Jackson by Jeff […]

Exhibition Reviews | Visual Arts

Anna Betbeze’s Primal Wool-Rug Abstractions Saturate the Senses at UMOCA

 Anna Betbeze’s hide-like abstractions in Dark Sun cling to UMOCA’s gallery walls, sagging slightly as they loom over the viewer with a deranged, yet mysteriously beautiful presence. Betbeze’s irregular painting surfaces are wool rugs that the artist burns, tatters and douses with ink and industrial acid-dyes. Vibrant colors […]

Exhibition Reviews | Visual Arts

Word (and Picture) Jazz from Filmmaker Tyrone Davies: In Camera in UMOCA’s Projects Gallery

Tyrone Davies’ In Camera comprises more than a dozen television sets arranged in deliberate, symmetrical spatial compositions around an altar-like pair that much of the time places an image of religious meditation in close proximity to a giant sports arena. Symbolism noted. All the sets are playing, a […]

Exhibition Reviews | Visual Arts

Grandma’s Cupboard: Kate Ericson, Mel Ziegler and Site Specific Installation at UMOCA

The current controversy over art’s funding, precipitated by the apparently politically-motivated firing of Utah Division of Arts and Museums director Lynnette Hiskey, exposes two fundamentally different ideals of how art should operate in modern society. To be fair, it’s not that the Tea Party-types don’t like art; they […]