15 Bytes | Exhibition Reviews | Visual Arts

Springville Salon 2012

Utah’s biggest display of artwork is up again at the Springville Museum of Art. In this review, Tony Watson takes a look at the actual winners and offers some alternatives.

Read the review in the May 2012 edition of 15 Bytes.

Tony Watson is originally from Washington State but has lived most of his adult life in Utah. No one occupation has occupied his working hours but his leisure hours are spent either climbing southern Utah’s redrock country or engaging his mind with aesthetic issues.

1 reply »

  1. Thanks for your rundown – I mean comments, about the Springville Show. I haven’t seen it yet, so having read your thoughts, I’ll see it differently than I might otherwise have. Often I too have scratched my head when viewing this show and wondered about the vagaries of juries. In fact, I entered a piece 3 years ago which was juried out of the show. But I felt it was a good painting and with the prospect of a different jury, entered it again the following year. It was accepted, won a merit award, and was purchased by the museum. Not one change to the painting. (24th of July Parade in Spring City)
    So there’s no accounting sometimes for what a jury will choose, or not.
    My comment refers more to your references to the CUAC. Living in Spring City, I’ve been to some shows at the CUAC. Gave up entering them, since the juries there seldom like my work. Why waste the money or the time, when their juries are looking for things like hair samples on little 2 inches pieces of tape? While some of what they show is interesting, and I often enjoy nonrepresentational work, a lot of it is the Emperor’s New Clothes. Sorry. That’s how I see it.
    I’m glad the Springville Salon shows what they do, even though I sometimes question it. Let the CUAC be the CUAC. One of them is enough.
    Springville doesn’t need little – or big – piles of manure with straws sticking out of it or taped hair samples or whatever. Let them show the virtuosity and imagination of the artists who enter and leave the CUAC to their hair samples.

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