Clay | Multi-media | Sculpture | Utah Artists - M | Video

Colour Maisch

Screen Shot 2013-10-28 at 9.02.28 PM

BIO

There seem to be two ways in which I understand the world: through my head and through my gut. While both modes have their place, I am drawn to the lush, animal nature of the gut. From this vantage point, I am free to make connections and construct narratives that seemingly have little rhyme or reason, yet touch on something that is familiar and collective. This approach to art making results in still lifes of lived moments. Nylon stockings combined with porcelain and dried grasses are about the characteristics of the materials themselves as well as their ability, when combined, to suggest the connection between ambiguity, contradiction and human experience. For instance, I use porcelain that has perceived value, with another material, such as inexpensive hosiery, that has a very different, if not opposite perceived value intentionally. They speak to the murky and unpretentious alchemical language of the body. The gut does not sort and categorize; the beautiful stews with the ugly, the valuable stews with the cheap and in the end the result is something like a poem that makes perfect sense in a perfectly, nonsensical way

LINKS

www.colourmaisch.com

ARTIST IMAGES

[portfolio_slideshow exclude=”23646″]

15 Bytes PROFILE

“Have you ever seen the side of a milkweed pod opening up?” Colour Maisch asks. She reaches under a table in her studio in the ceramics wing of the art department at the University of Utah and digs into a large box filled with milkweed pods. She rummages until she finds a good one. It is a long dry paisley of a thing bearing a little crack with white fluff peeking out.

“It just makes me…” she trails off as she pulls open the pod with both hands. It makes quiet cracking sounds as it opens. Inside, there is the packed fluff, but the pod keeps opening, and opens further, and radiates wide and then the fluff is like a nimbus of big dandelion seeds. “I almost get weepy,” she says…

Read the full article in the June 2013 edition of 15 Bytes.

Tagged as:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *