UTAH'S ART MAGAZINE SINCE 2001
Published by Artists of Utah, a 501 (c) 3 non-profit organization.

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Book Reviews
An Obituary for our Time: Scott Abbott’s Immortal for Quite Some Time

An Obituary for our Time: Scott Abbott’s Immortal for Quite Some Time

Reviewed by Brooke Williams The first thing I read on opening Scott Abbott’s Immortal for Quite Some Time was that “This is not a memoir.” I agree. This book is, in my opinion, the world’s most perfect obituary. I’ve been reading them in the newspaper since my mother’s death in 1994, when I realized that...

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Miraculous Knots: Nancy Takacs' new volume of poetry is full of startling imagery and delicate revelations

Miraculous Knots: Nancy Takacs’ new volume of poetry is full of startling imagery and delicate revelations

reviewed by Richard Hedderman   If for a moment you imagine language as a length of rope, a poem forms when you start tying knots in the rope and pulling them tight, snugging them and squeezing all the air out. The poet may then submit to the reader that his imagination run over the knots...

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The Poetic Finesse of Katharine Coles’ Flight

The Poetic Finesse of Katharine Coles’ Flight

Katharine Coles’ writing style is pared-down and precise. The former Utah Poet Laureate (2006-2012) often uses punctuation in order to minimize verbiage, and favors “erasures” to create new poems by eliminating words from an existing text. The effect can seem a bit chilly, though it set the perfect tone for her marvelous The Earth is...

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Vessels from a Hindu goddess to Mae West: Paisley Rekdal’s Imaginary Vessels.

Vessels from a Hindu goddess to Mae West: Paisley Rekdal’s Imaginary Vessels.

Paisley Rekdal, who won the 2013 15 Bytes Book Award in Poetry for “Animal Eye” (as well as an impressive number of other fancier prizes), has published a new book of poetry with the prestigious Copper Canyon Press. As with her previous books, Imaginary Vessels is sheer pleasure to read. Words tumble over each other...

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An ecstatic, mystical encounter with the divine: Alex Caldiero’s Who is the Dancer, What is the Dance?

An ecstatic, mystical encounter with the divine: Alex Caldiero’s Who is the Dancer, What is the Dance?

This past September, after I came home from a weeklong river trip, a friend told me I needed to read Alex Caldiero’s new book, Who is the Dancer, What is the Dance (Saltfront, 2016). The book is a facsimile of a poetic journal Caldiero kept on a six-day trip on the Colorado River through Cataract...

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Feminist Reality, Feminist Mystery: Julie J. Nichols' Pigs When They Straddle the Air

Feminist Reality, Feminist Mystery: Julie J. Nichols’ Pigs When They Straddle the Air

Some titles, like Many Things Have Happened Since He Died by Elizabeth Dewberry and All the Light We Cannot See by Anthony Doerr, have made me want to read a novel when I know nothing at all about the author and haven’t read a review. The title itself creates a sort of tension that seems...

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Jumping Naked in the Backyard: Zoe Murdock's "Man in the Mirror" explores the interior and exterior world of Alzheimer's

Jumping Naked in the Backyard: Zoe Murdock’s “Man in the Mirror” explores the interior and exterior world of Alzheimer’s

reviewed by Phyllis Barber Old age is a terrain most of us have not traveled. We’ve not been there before (and most people think they’ll never get there, either, keeping the reality, as well as the idea, at bay. Except, there are those times when a brush with old age cannot be helped!). Old age...

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A Nuclear Alphabet for Downwinders: Michael McLane's Trace Elements

A Nuclear Alphabet for Downwinders: Michael McLane’s Trace Elements

Michael McLane is the man behind the Utah Book Festival, which this month is bringing authors and book lovers together across the state. But he's also a writer, and in this companion piece to our podcast on Trent Alvey, Amy Brunvand takes a look at McLane's Elik Press publication Trace Elements: Mapping the Great Basin...

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Identity, Self and Purpose:  A Review of Brian Evenson’s The Warren

Identity, Self and Purpose: A Review of Brian Evenson’s The Warren

Human identity can be said to rely on two things: who we are, and what we do. This being and action gives humans purpose. As a Mormon boy growing up in Utah, the knowledge of my ancestors and faith told me who I was, and what I was supposed to do. Not only was I...

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Making Life Out of Dust: Bev Magennis’ Alibi Creek

Making Life Out of Dust: Bev Magennis’ Alibi Creek

When Willa Cather wrote a female protagonist and gave an impression of male-ness to the hard, western landscape of her novel, O Pioneers, she probably wasn’t trying to do anything radical. She was writing what she knew. Though perhaps she also meant the book to be a deliberate misreading of the classic literary myth of...

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Nancy Takacs' Red Voices

Nancy Takacs’ Red Voices

by Ed Bennett The myth of Echo as we know it appeared in Book III of Ovid’s “Metamorphoses.” She was a mountain nymph, part of a group with whom Zeus liked to dally. Whenever Zeus’ wife, the goddess Hera, attempted to find her husband during these interludes, she was distracted by Echo, who would engage...

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Of Peripheries and the Sublime: Kevin Holdsworth’s Good Water

Of Peripheries and the Sublime: Kevin Holdsworth’s Good Water

In his collection of essays called Good Water, Kevin Holdsworth says, “To find and frequent the periphery is imperative for the artist, and dangerous—the margin is a sucking whirlpool.” Could there be a place more marginal or peripheral than the small town of Good Water in Wayne County, Utah from which his collection takes its...

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