Literary Arts

Articles on Utah literary arts, utah authors, utah literature and poetry published in 15 Bytes.

Book Reviews | Literary Arts

Change and Distortion of the Human Condition in Paisley Rekdal’s Nightingale

Nightingale is the fifth full-length book of poems by award-winning poet Paisley Rekdal, Utah’s current poet laureate and director of the University of Utah’s creative writing program. The cover features a stunning black and white image by New York artist Sara VanDerBeek entitled “White Nude.” Nightingale is published […]

Book Reviews | Literary Arts

James McLaughlin’s Bearskin is a Hallucinatory Literary Thriller as Much About the Wilds of the Forest as the Poaching That Takes Place There

In James A. McLaughlin’s debut novel Bearskin, Rice Moore must choose to preserve his personal safety in anonymity or risk exposure by trying to catch the people responsible for the illegal killings of bear. The book is a plot-driven yet meaningful story of justice and redemption set in […]

Literary Arts | READ LOCAL First

Stephen Trimble: The Blue Gate

This month we bring you Stephen Trimble—one of Utah’s most influential artists in Utah’s 15 (Vol. II). Among his other honors: The Sierra Club’s Ansel Adams Award for photography and conservation; The National Cowboy Museum’s Western Heritage “Wrangler” Award; and a Doctor of Humane Letters from his alma mater, Colorado College.

Trimble’s latest work includes an anthology of the best writing about Captiol Reef, The Capitol Reef Reader, to be published by the University of Utah Press in June 2019. His introduction to the Reader (his 25th book) grew from this piece, “The Blue Gate.”

Book Reviews | Literary Arts

The Imagination of History and Gender in Katharine Coles’ Look Both Ways

After finishing Look Both Ways, I found myself recommending it to friends based on its ability to cause me to rethink imagination, history, and gender. It’s an imaginative book, self-imaginative. It’s a biography/memoir by Katharine Coles that centers on her grandmother, Miriam Wollaeger Link, and their respective journeys around the […]

Artist Profiles | Literary Arts | Visual Arts

Stephen Trimble: Interpreter and Messenger

One snowy day in 2011, Stephen Trimble and his wife, Joanne Slotnik, arrived at a grove on the lower slopes of Mount Rainier with the ashes of his father. Trimble was born in Denver in 1950 to Don and Isabelle Trimble. Isabelle grew up in a small Montana town. Don was a geologist who worked his way through college and graduate school as a hard rock miner at the tail end of the Depression. He was responsible for Steve’s interest in photography and the natural world, Isabelle for his interest in people, and both for his respect for storytelling. “Every vacation was a new national park, and on our road trips Dad kept up a running commentary on Western history and landscape,” Trimble remembers. “His stories sounded more like parable. He retold them to communicate his values.” With reverential regard, Don Trimble, who hailed from Toppenish, Washington, referred to Mount Rainier as “The Mountain.”