15 Bytes

15 Bytes | Exhibition Reviews | Visual Arts

Eliding the Hypen: Nicholas Galanin’s video series at BYU examines cultural hybridity

Our country is increasingly becoming a place of hyphenated identities, in which we speak of ourselves in relation to the countries or continents our ancestors came from — African-American, Italian-American, Korean-American. This increased focus on cultural and ethnic identity is double-edged: the hyphen acts as both a bond, […]

15 Bytes | Exhibition Reviews | Visual Arts

Sean Morello’s Constellations & Supersymmetries at UMOCA

[slideShowProSC width=”600″ height=”700″ album=”491″] Aesthetic theory has always been a subset of Philosophy, a body of human thought that modern science has essentially rendered obsolete. The problem is that philosophers, be they Plato or Kant, want to legislate reality: to say, not Is this beautiful? but rather, What […]

15 Bytes | Exhibition Reviews | Visual Arts

The Minutiae of Death: Jared Christensen’s Strange Environments at Sweet Branch Library

It’s hard to predict what thoughts and experiences will affect an artist’s work, but major life changes — birth, death, marriage, divorce — almost always surface in the work of creative individuals, whether explicitly or implicitly. One such example can be found this month at the Sweet Branch […]

15 Bytes | Exhibition Reviews | Visual Arts

Untamed Rebellion: The Custom Car Art of Ed ‘Big Daddy’ Roth

America has a way of normalizing rebellion. Beat poets in smoky coffee shops turned into hipster coders in Starbucks; the opt-outs of surf culture were transformed into commercial commodities packaged by Gidget and The Beach Boys; and the body art once reserved for sailors has become a rite of passage for 21st-century housewives. Mid-century hot-rod culture has gone through a similar domestication: vestiges of its fiery independence and outsider quality can be found in the low-rider tradition of Mexican Americans, but hot-rods are now a matter of nostalgic collecting for graying baby boomers, and the “weirdo” vibe of Kustom Kulture has become normalized to the point that the bulgy-eyed, adrenaline-fueled monsters that were once synonymous with the rebellious nature of the subculture have become part of the mainstream: you’ll see similar characters on almost any program of the Cartoon Network.