Author Archives

Geoff Wichert

Geoff Wichert has degrees in critical writing and creative nonfiction. He writes about art to settle the arguments going on in his head.

Exhibition Reviews | Visual Arts

Finding Fertile Ground in the Desert: The Harrison Museum stakes a claim for the transcendent role of Western art

On a partition amid the downstairs gallery of the Harrison Museum in Logan hang three hand-woven Hopi plaques, or flat dishes. The backwards-F motif of the central disc repeats six times, as if rotating rapidly around its center. To the left, a woven black-and-white pattern suggests a hoop, […]

Performing Arts | Theater

Reading Ripley: Weller Bookworks stages a reading of Phyllis Nagy’s The Talented Mr. Ripley

The novel and (actually, several) films of The Talented Mr. Ripley are readily available in Salt Lake, but until this week the play has not been. A first step in rectifying that omission was made on Monday night, when Weller Booksworks, as part of both its Free Play Reading Series and the Utah Humanities Book Festival, staged a free reading in the bookstore. Although presented without costumes or scenery and only minimal action, the actors prepared as they would for any staging, rehearsing and working together to develop characters and impart the right voices.

15 Bytes | Exhibition Reviews | Visual Arts

As You Pull Away, It Comes Into Focus: Elisabeth Higgins O’Connor in the Shaw Gallery

  It would be helpful if words could capture the sequence of impressions created by a first encounter with Confetti and Distress, Honey and Suspicion. We know what to expect with paintings and sculpture, and increasingly now with performance, installation, video—all the newer media that have become familiar […]

Exhibition Reviews | Visual Arts

Grandma’s Cupboard: Kate Ericson, Mel Ziegler and Site Specific Installation at UMOCA

  The current controversy over art’s funding, precipitated by the apparently politically-motivated firing of Utah Division of Arts and Museums director Lynnette Hiskey, exposes two fundamentally different ideals of how art should operate in modern society. To be fair, it’s not that the Tea Party-types don’t like art; […]