15 Bytes | 2002 | Visual Arts

ART ON THE HILL: THE 2002 UTAH LEGISLATURE AND THE VISUAL ARTS

The Utah Legislature will be in session during January and March of 2002, with a break for the Olympics. The following articles are designed to inform the public about issues that will be addressed during the 2002 Legislative session which affect the visual arts community. The opinions expressed are those of the writer and not necessarily those of Artists of Utah or 15 BYTES.

WILL WE HAVE ART IN OUR PUBLIC BUILDINGS?

 

Paintings, murals, and sculpture adorn many of our public spaces and buildings due to a bill passed by the 1985 Utah Legislature. The 1% for Art bill, passed over fifteen years ago, allocates public funds for art to be incorporated into new and/or renovated state public buildings. The Utah Arts Council was given the authority to provide leadership in this endeavor, along with the State’s Division of Facilities Construction and Management.


A year ago, the Legislature’s Capital Facilities and Administration Services Committee, which has the right to oversee the art selection process for each building, made an unprecedented decision. It considered eliminating all funding for building projects in the year 2001.

In response to this threat to the Public Art Program, Bonnie H. Stephens, Director of the Utah Arts Council, and Jim Glenn, director of the Public Art Program, appeared before the committee in early February 2001. They made a presentation urging the Legislature to retain the 1% funding for art in public buildings. However, when the committee presented its budget proposals to the Executive Appropriations Committee on February 21, their proposal contained the following language: It is the intent of the Legislature that the state funds appropriated for capital projects not include funding for art. This effectively eliminated all funding for art in public buildings for the year 2001. During the 2002 Legislative session, the Legislature will once again consider the issue of funding for art in public buildings.

This article appeared in the January 2002 edition of 15 Bytes.

Categories: 15 Bytes | 2002 | Visual Arts

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